What is a palindrome?

A palindrome is a word, phrase, number or sequence of symbols that reads exactly the same backwards as it does forwards. Examples of word palindromes are racecar, mom, dad, pop, deed, civic, pip, level, rotor, eye, nun, toot, radar, wow, Hannah. Here are some phrase palindromes: Never odd or even Too bad, I hid a boot Was it Eliot’s toilet […]

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Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo

Believe it or not, that is a grammatically correct sentence in American English! How is that possible? Well, consider the fact that “Buffalo” is a city in New York, while “buffalo” means to bully or intimidate, as well as being a synonym for bison. So: Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo means: New York bison whom other New […]

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Common errors series: ‘it’s’ vs. ‘its’

This is an error I see all the time and it is really very simple to remember the difference. When a word has been shortened we use an apostrophe to show a letter has been omitted. In the case of ‘it’s’ the original word was ‘it is’. However ‘its’ with no apostrophe shows possession, i.e. that something belongs to someone. […]

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Punctuation saves lives!

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When writing—whether an email, book manuscript or corporate document—make sure not to omit punctuation that, if absent, completely changes the meaning of a sentence! My daughter loves this one…Enjoy! Yours in crisp, error-free writing, Jessica xx

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Four little words that trip me up every time…

Okay, so no-one is perfect…I may be an editor and proofreader who spends her days correcting other people’s mistakes, but just like I see the same errors over and over—such as ‘loose’ instead of ‘lose’ and ‘your’ instead of ‘you’re’ (which I previously featured on this blog)—there are four words that consistently trip me up. They are: – Restaurant – […]

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Navigating through the differences between American English and British English

Just as weights and measurements are not standardized throughout the world—in America we use pounds and miles, while in Canada, South Africa and Europe they use kilograms and kilometers—neither are the spelling of words in those countries the same. Here are some common examples: United States Canada/South Africa/Europe   -or vs. -our Behavior Behaviour Color Colour Flavor Flavour Harbor Harbour […]

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Common errors series: ‘your’ instead of ‘you’re’

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‘Your’ is a word that denotes possession, for example: “Class, please take out your workbooks.” ‘You’re’ is a contraction of the phrase ‘You are’. Since we are shortening ‘You are’ to ‘You’re’ we insert an apostrophe to show that some letters have been omitted. For example: “You’re not going to believe what I just heard!” In my editing and proofreading […]

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A fascination with the word ‘remains’

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During my recent web redesign, while collecting all the elements for my web designer, I noticed that three books I edited all have ‘Remains’ in their titles: Remains – a novel by Mark W. Tiedemann What Remains (originally titled Immediate Family) – a novel by Bart Baker All That Remains – a poetry anthology by Peter Serchuk I hadn’t realized […]

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The sparkle and promise of a new day!

You know how some days you wake up feeling blah and you just want to crawl back into bed and shut out the world? Then other days you feel like the day ahead holds so much promise and potential! Today I’m feeling especially grateful for all the blessings in my life—let’s keep in mind those in Oklahoma who lost possessions, […]

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Limerick fun on a Friday!

Just for a bit of fun, I thought I’d post my favorite limerick of all time here. Enjoy and have a great weekend! There once was a man from Dumbarton Who thought he could run like a Spartan On the forty-ninth lap His braces went “snap!” And his face went a red Scottish tartan Yours in crisp, error-free writing Jessica […]

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